Lobismuller

“In some places in Galicia, the tradition goes that a male child born on Christmas Eve or Good Friday, or as the seventh or ninth in a consecutive line of male children, is predestined to become a lobishome.”†

[…] 43 years old, 4 feet 6 inches tall, slightly dark-complexioned, with a birthmark on his face, light brown eyes, black hair and beard, partly bald on the top of his head, by no means repugnant in appearance, with no distinguishing features. A tender, timid gaze, yet fierce, haughty, and deliberately serene, a heartbeat of 62 per minute. Nothing can be discerned in his appearance that sets him apart from an ordinary man.

Was the Werewolf of Allariz a woman? In 1853, Manuel Blanco Romasanta was tried for the murder of 17 people: he confessed to nine of them but declared himself not guilty because he was suffering from a curse that turned him into a wolf. Although this defence was rejected at trial, his death sentence was commuted to allow doctors to investigate the case. Thus, Romasanta has become part of Spanish folklore as the Werewolf of Allariz or less commonly as the Tallow Man, so named for the rendering of his victims fat to make high quality soap. More than 150 years later, this case still haunts our collective memory and baffles criminologists, psychologists and historians. According to recent forensic theories, the killer, who was named Manuela at the time of his birth and raised as a girl until the age of 6, could have lived with a rare syndrome of intersexuality. 

“In some places in Galicia, the tradition goes that a female child born on Christmas Eve or Good Friday, or as the seventh or ninth in a consecutive line of female children, is predestined to become a lobismuller.”†