Lobismuller

“In some places in Galicia, the tradition goes that a male child born on Christmas Eve or Good Friday, or as the seventh or ninth in a consecutive line of male children, is predestined to become a lobishome.”†

[…] 43 years old, 4 feet 6 inches tall, slightly dark-complexioned, with a birthmark on his face, light brown eyes, black hair and beard, partly bald on the top of his head, by no means repugnant in appearance, with no distinguishing features. A tender, timid gaze, yet fierce, haughty, and deliberately serene, a heartbeat of 62 per minute. Nothing can be discerned in his appearance that sets him apart from an ordinary man.

What if the most bloodthirsty serial murder of Spain was not a man? In 1853, Manuel Blanco Romasanta was trialed for the murder of almost 20 women and children: he confessed to nine of them, but declared himself not guilty because he was suffering from a curse that turned him into a wolf. Romasanta then became part of the folklore of Galicia as the Werewolf of Allariz  — as well as the Tallow Man, as they allegedly rendered the victims to make high quality soap. More than 150 years later, this case still haunts our collective memory and baffles criminologists, anthropologists and historians. In 2012 while investigating the fate of Romasanta, forensics stablished that the killer could actually have been an intersex person. Lobismuller reconstructs the tale of the most enigmatic spanish criminal blurring the gender duality and wondering how this new discovery could have played a role in the story.

“In some places in Galicia, the tradition goes that a female child born on Christmas Eve or Good Friday, or as the seventh or ninth in a consecutive line of female children, is predestined to become a lobismuller.”†